CLOSE
« x »

X-PRESS GRADUATE AWARD WINNERS

Jessica Jones Collection Photo: Tricia Cheah
Jessica Jones Collection
Photo: Tricia Cheah

In the last month Curtin, Polytechnic West, Central and ECU all held their Graduate Fashion Parades, with one student from each chosen for the X-Press Award. Congratulations all!

JESSICA JONES Polytechnic West

 

When did you first realise that fashion design was the career for you?

I started teaching myself to sew when I was in high school simply because I couldn’t find the clothes that I wanted anywhere. From that point on I knew that I wanted to pursue fashion as a career, and kept sewing while completing a Fine Arts degree at UWA to give myself a solid art foundation to draw upon.

 

How did you end up at Polytechnic?

Everyone I spoke to highly recommended Polytechnic West due to their strong emphasis on the technical side of fashion, and the way that the course was structured to teach you everything from the ground up.

 

Would you say a Polytechnic Fashion Design course is a good springboard to getting started in the industry?

I definitely think that studying Fashion Design at Polytechnic is a fantastic springboard to getting started in the industry. The course gives you a thorough grounding in the technical side of the fashion industry with classes on design, patternmaking, grading, construction and more to ensure you have the practical skills to bring your designs to life.

 

How do you describe your design aesthetic?

My design aesthetic is feminine and romantic with a twist. I’m inspired by many things including the Victorian era and the Pre-Raphaelite art movement, and I love to combine delicate fabrics and feminine silhouettes with darker elements. I also place a strong emphasis on attention to detail, and often use intricate embellishment and hand finishing techniques in my designs.

Is there any advice you would give young, budding designers just setting out?

A piece of advice that I would give budding designers is don’t be afraid of developing your own design style and aesthetic, because ultimately that is what sets everyone apart from each other. Celebrate the things that are uniquely yours and do what excites you, because that will give you the inspiration and determination to keep pushing yourself further.

 

RINI TENG Central Institute

When did you first realise that fashion design was the career for you?

When I was young I was always interested in the arts. My background is in traditional dance and the costumes they wore always interested me so fashion was a natural transition.

 

How did you end up at Central?

I was researching courses in WA and wanted something innovative. CIT was always at the head of the page with their creative and hands on style of teaching.

 

Would you say a Central Fashion Design course is a good springboard to getting started in the industry?

CIT teaches you the full process a design studio would go through from start to finish. It’s a great feeling going to any designer and being able to help straight away.

How do you describe your design aesthetic?

I like clean, flowing styles that hold meaning.

 

Is there any advice you would give young, budding designers just setting out?

You have to really know what you want. Always be willing to adapt and learn new styles of design and craft because fashion is always changing. Don’t be afraid to break out and do something different, you might set a new trend.

 

JOANA EHMES Edith Cowan University

 

When did you first realise that fashion design was the career for you?

After starting my degree at ECU I did a few electives in Textiles and Fashion. The unique approach and teaching motivated me to understand fashion as a form, supported by different materials and techniques to generate work.

 

How did you end up at Edith Cowan University?

When I came to Perth to study I was a little insecure about what to study. I decided to go to ECU as they provide a great freedom and flexibility when choosing electives and experimenting units.

 

Would you say a Edith Cowan University course is a good springboard to getting started in the industry?

Considering that it is not an easy industry, the lecturers provide a number of very good opportunities to participate in competitions and events that provide visibility.

 

How do you describe your design aesthetic?

After research on the conceptual background, I usually start the process by identifying what I want to transmit to the viewer and wearer. From there my designs tend to complement the body’s physiognomy.

 

Is there any advice you would give young, budding designers just setting out?

​I would probably let them know that like everything it is not easy and it requires a lot of work but if you passionate about what you are doing than everything is easier.

 

MAEGAN DA SILVA Curtin

 

When did you first realise that fashion design was the career for you?

Growing up with a mother that was also very much into fashion, it has always been a dream of mine to be a fashion designer. This however only became a possibility when my family migrated to Australia in 2006; at the time I was 15 years old and began doing textiles at St Brigid’s College. I soon realised that my dreams could become my reality; I knew then that I wanted to pursue a career in fashion.

How did you end up at Curtin?

I initially intended to do the TAFE course first to get hands on technical training and then complete the degree at Curtin; however at the time the course was only being offered part-time due to low numbers mid-year entry. After having done extensive research; I was drawn to Curtin because of their more concept-driven approach.

Would you say a Curtin Fashion Design course is a good springboard to getting started in the industry?

At Curtin, students are encouraged to push the boundaries, to think ‘out of the box’ and to explore their creativity. The Curtin Graduate Showcase is a great means of exposure and a fantastic opportunity for young up-coming designers.
How do you describe your design aesthetic?

Born and raised in the Caribbean; The twin Island of Trinidad and Tobago and migrating to Australia in my teens, has helped shape a distinctive design aesthetic that evokes an evocative blend of influences from two contrasting cultures. ​As a designer I want to deliver innovative and evocative garments while maintaining the integrity of design and quality.

Is there any advice you would give young, budding designers just setting out?

Stay true to who you are as a designer, it’s what makes you and your work original. Develop your own aesthetic so your work can speak for itself and has your signature.

 

All winners will be featured in a special shoot for the next X-Press Fashion season launch in 2015.

« x »