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Katy Perry

katy

Prism

Capitol/EMI 

There are those pop stars that are happy to fit into the mould and play the music that radio insists, yet Katy Perry is one who prefers to break the rules. The preacher’s daughter was content to shock her family by kissing a girl and going one further in an ménage a trois during the song Last Friday Night (T.G.I.F). Her third record, Prism, is another step forward in the evolution of this pop princess.

Perry is growing up in front of our eyes and recovering from real life disappointments such as a short-lived marriage to Russell Brand. Perry has a couple of fine assets that have no doubt assisted in her attention, with her voice being the most potent. Not as powerful as some of the current divas, she does possess an earthy rasp that sets her apart.

Roar was deservedly flogged to death on radio and any other media imaginable. It may have a verse that delivers its melody by stealth, but the chorus is a modern pop revelation that refuses to leave your head even on the first listen.  There are misfires in overblown Legendary Lovers and the over-bleached rap of Dark Horse, yet when Perry rolls out the disco of Birthday or the subdued Double Rainbow she corners the mainstream pop market.

Prism is far from Perry’s most consistent effort, though as always the high points are well worth more than a passing listen.

 

CHRIS HAVERCROFT